Home-Built laptop computer table complete.

My home-built laptop computer table. I wanted a stable, portable (folds up) and reasonably sized laptop table that I could work at and maintain a proper sitting position. It has a keyboard shelf large enough to fit a full size keyboard and a mouse.

I started out with my computer chair, setting the height for proper position of my feet and legs, than worked out the table top height for viewing the display, and leg and chair room, then the keyboard shelf height last.

To fold up the table, the two keyboard shelf supports have to be removed. I could have used metal cables or some other type of support that would have made the table easier to fold up, but I liked the look of the wooden supports.

The table top is 30 1/2" high, 36" wide, and 15" deep. The keyboard shelf is 24 1/2" high, 26" wide, and 8 3/4" deep. The table top and keyboard shelf are both 3/4" thick.


Rounding the edges of the laptop table top.

The table top and keyboard shelf are made from solid Aspen wood, edge glued ready to finish panels I bought from a home center.

I used the full size panel for the table top and rounded over the edges with my Craftsman router and 3/8" radius router bit.


Cutting boards to length with my miter saw.

I used aspen wood for all my table parts with the exception of poplar for the two side rails because of its availability locally at a reasonable price and in dimensions that were convenient to work with.

Aspen is categorized as a hardwood but is a very soft hardwood and It has various characteristics that make it disliked by woodworkers. If you stain aspen you have to use a conditioner first to seal the pores or the finish will be too dark and uneven.


Rounding over leg and rung edges.

Rounding the edges of the legs and supports with my 3/16" radius router bit.

Laptop table leg rounded with my Craftsman 3/16" radius #25585 router bit.
Rounding the laptop table leg ends.

I rounded the top ends of the legs with a jig I made by drilling a countersink hole in a board and threading a countersink head screw into the hole and clamping the jig to the top of my router table.

I also drilled mounting holes into the laptop table legs to round the leg ends and for mounting the legs to the table.


Rear legs with holes for the 3/4" dowel cross rail and table top side rails with front legs mounted to the side rails with 1/4"-20 screws and lock nuts.

Rear legs with holes for the 3/4" dowel cross rail and table top side rails with front legs mounted to the side rails with 1/4"-20 screws and lock nuts.


Cutting the tenon mortise into one of the legs.

I started out chiseling one mortise into each of the two rear legs for a horizontal rails and later decided to add a second rail for side to side stiffness and appearance.


The tenons on the horizontal rails are cut.

The tenons on the horizontal rails are cut. I added a second horizontal rail because I didn't want the table to have side to The tenons on the horizontal rails are cut. I added a second horizontal rail because I didn't want the table to have side to side play.


My homemade threaded insert installation tool. Threaded brass insert installed into leg.

I made a threaded insert installation tool by cutting the head off a 1/4"-20 bolt, and adding a nut and a captive nut, then using a drill to drive in the insert. (right image) Threaded brass insert installed into a laptop table leg.


Underside of table top with all rails mounted.

The side rails are used as leg mounts for two of the legs. The front rail is used as a stop for the other two legs that are joined by the two horizontal rails and the 3/4" dowel.


Old power steering pump with inlet tube removed. Old power steering pump with inlet tube removed.
Drilling the dowel holes on the keyboard shelf ends.

An inexpensive dowel kit and behind it the Edge of the keyboard shelf with the dowel hole locations marked.


The keyboard shelf end rail outer view.
The inner side of the keyboard shelf end rail.

I attached the keyboard shelf and shelf end rails with wood dowels. I elongated one of the dowel holes in each of the end rails to allow for expansion and contraction of the keyboard shelf.

I also have a 1/4"-20 locking nut tightly fit into the rail end and epoxied in place to mount the shelf to the table legs.

I have a threaded brass insert installed into the outer side to the end rails to mount the front keyboard shelf supports.


Laptop computer table with laptop computer, full size keyboard and mouse.

Here is the complete laptop table minus a finish and a few tweaks with my laptop computer, full size keyboard and mouse on board. There is also plenty of room for some papers, books, and other stuff.